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obnoxBoodalouRee
11 Score

The Rockometer: Boogalou Reed by Obnox

It's not just the whole damn country that's about to blow up, with his third long player in less than three years, Lamont "Bim" Thomas is due to blow up, too. For more than any other Obnox record, Boogalou Reed, showcases Thomas' unique ability to blur the lines between punk rock, hip-hop, and experimental sounds. There are no beat-based joints, or punk rock ragers, or improv head fucks. Instead, there are Obnox songs, fifteen of them, to be precise, and each one gives the listener a slightly different perspective into the mind of Thomas, on this, the outlaw rockers' most poignant work to date.
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TwerpsRangeAnxiety
7 Score

The Rockometer: Range Anxiety by Twerps

The Twerps are admitted fans of the Go-Betweens. And, depending on your own listening habits, you may hear traces of C86, The Kinks, or the Shins on Range Anxiety, the band's first album for Merge Records. This is all another way of saying the casual facade of this Australian quartet conceals a deep understanding of what makes guitar pop tick.
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SleaterKinney_NoCitiesToLove_cover-608x608
8 Score

The Rockometer: No Cities to Love by Sleater-Kinney

Sleater-Kinney are an important band, a very important band. Their left-leaning politics and fiercely proud feminism sheltered countless listeners during the band's first run through the '90s and early-to-mid '00s. Carrie Brownstein also has one helluva rock kick. And you know that song of theirs, "No Rock 'N' Roll Fun?" Turn it around and the message becomes, Sleater-Kinney are Rock 'N' Roll fun.
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VietCongAlbumCover
9 Score

The Rockometer: S/T by Viet Cong

It's not that the Canadian post-punk outfit, Viet Cong, have listened to different albums than you and I and everyone else active in the underground music scene. The foreboding tones of Ian Curtis and Joy Division provide a convenient starting point for anyone with a passing interest in what's happened outside of the mainstream during the past 30 years. Yet, unlike pretty much everyone else who has turned to the early days of UK post-punk for inspiration, the finished product is anything but a by the note reproduction of once ground-breaking sounds.
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GotobedsPoorPeopleAreRevolting
10 Score

The Rockometer: Poor People Are Revolting by The Gotobeds

What's not to like about these Pittsburgh smart-asses, the Gotobeds? Poor People Are Revolting, the band's debut long player for Gerald Cosloy's 12XU, is two sides of punk rock slop packed with clever vocal jabs and insatiable melodies.
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YesImLeavingSlowRelease
9 Score

The Rockometer: Slow Release by Yes I’m Leaving

Slow Release, the latest long player by the Sydney band, Yes I'm Leaving, is a record you can judge by its cover, its back cover to be more precise. Let's read over these song titles. Side one starts with "One," and leads to "Puncher," "Fear," "Alchemy," "Timer" and "Salt." Side two reads "Care Less," " Manic," "Funny," "Secret," and "Husk."
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Thurston-Moore-The-Best-Day
8 Score

The Rockometer: The Best Day by Thurston Moore

I'm not terribly interested in Thurston Moore's personal life. As a Sonic Youth fan, it sucks that indie rock super couple, Moore and Kim Gordon split. But, I'm not going to get into the blame game, labeling Moore a misogynist pig for ditching Gordon for a younger model. Breakups aren't easy. Breakups are rarely clean. And when a break up involves one of the most admired underground rock bands in history, it only serves to reason that some with no skin in the game will all of a sudden take a personal interest in Moore and Gordon's personal matters. Sonic Youth was a fucking institution for three fucking decades. Yet, to hear Moore tell it, Sonic Youth had started to run its course, too.
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NudeBeach77AlbumCover
7 Score

The Rockometer: 77 by Nude Beach

While the album title, 77, may suggest the golden era of punk rock, Nude Beach's behemoth, 18 song, 70+ minute effort actually pays homage to a different Rock 'N' Roll tradition -- That of the American bar rock band. That old practice of men working for the weekend and then ringing it in with beers and blasting guitars may wax and wane, but never completely goes out of style. Depending on your vantage point, the trio of Chuck Betz, Ryan Naideau, and Jim Shelton may remind you of Tom Petty in the '70s, The Replacements in the '80s, Wilco's early output in the '90s, or contemporary rabble-rousers like The Men.
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